Math1071Q Spring 2016

Practice material for first exam

Note that this document does not in any way express what will or will not be on the exam, what you should or should not focus on for the exam, nor the difficulty nor the type of problems you should expect. This document is for extra practice only. Also, expect typos as usual.

Practice For First Exam

Practice material for second exam

Note that this document does not in any way express what will or will not be on the exam, what you should or should not focus on for the exam, nor the difficulty nor the type of problems you should expect. This document is for extra practice only. Also, expect typos as usual.

(Last edited: Apr8th 5:38 pm)

Practice Test without solutions

Practice Test with solutions

Specific Topics

Constant Sign Theorem: This theorem may be used for determining when a function is positive/negative, or increasing/decreasing, or concave up/concave down.

Linear Approximation: This details how one uses the derivative to linearly approximate specific computations.

Handouts

Note that these handouts will contain typos–if you see any, feel free to let me know!

1.1 Handout

1.2 Handout

1.3,5 Lecture Notes

3.1 Lecture Notes

3.2 Lecture Notes

3.3 Lecture Notes

4.5 Lecture Notes

Quiz 8 with solutions

 

Lecture Notes

The following notes have a more textbook like formatting and (when time permits) contain supplemental material such as exercises, schemes for doing problems, and worked out examples. As usual, there will probably be typos in these notes, so feel free to contact me to correct them. These notes will probably be updated periodically. Note schemes of problem solutions and examples are at the ends of the documents.

5.1 Lecture Notes

5.2 Lecture Notes

5.3 Lecture Notes

5.4 Lecture Notes (Curve Sketching)

5.3/5.4 Additional Help

Constant Sign Theorem

5.5 Lecture Notes

5.6 Lecture Notes

6.1 Lecture Notes (Antiderivatives, Indefinite Integrals)

6.2 Lecture Notes (Substitution)

6.2 Lecture Notes (Substitution, without color)

6.3 skipped

6.4 Lecture Notes (The Definite Integral)

6.5 Lecture Notes (The Fundamental Theorem of Calculus)

Review Guides

These attachments only serve as additional review. They do not necessarily suggest what material will or will not be on home works, quizzes, tests, etc.

Chapter 1 Review

Chapter 3 Review (will try to add more)

Challenge Problems

In the attached file will be several challenge problems (it will be updated as much as I can). Their purpose is to provide extra practice on the material presented in class. These problems are completely optional and provide no indication about exam questions or the like; they are purely for extra practice and fun. Feel free to ask me for help, solutions, or even more problems!

Challenge Problems

Common Mistakes

Here is a document consisting of common mistakes made in math courses. I am not sure how helpful this list will be, but hopefully it might remind a student or two of some mistake to avoid.

Common Mistakes

Additional Resources

Patrick JMT:

Link: WebsiteYoutube

Description: His website and youtube channel contain many videos on different calculus topics. He’s also a great chess player.

Khan Academy:

Link: Khan Academy

Description: This is what I used when I took calculus I-IV. They have made a ton of youtube videos for many fields and the website has many practice problems. You have to make an account, but it’s worth it.

Paul’s Online Math Notes

Link: Paul’s Online Math Notes Calculus 1

Description: Basically just a bunch of webpages concerning calculus material. This site was really helpful for me.

Q Center:

Link: QCenter

About us:

The University of Connecticut’s Quantitative Learning Center (Q Center) is a resource to elevate the proficiency of students taking quantitative intensive (Q) courses across the undergraduate curriculum. We provide direct assistance to students via peer tutoring, review sessions, and the creation of innovative learning tools.

During the academic year, our main activities include:

Free drop-in peer tutoring Sundays to Fridays on the first floor of the Homer Babbage Library.
Review sessions for students in highly populated Q courses.
Working with faculty teaching Q courses to improve student learning.

Youtube

Link: Youtube

Description: I think we all know Youtube. However, you might not be aware of the massive amounts of youtubers who make education videos. If you are stuck on a math concept and want someone to explain it to you “in person”, just youtube it!